Occupy Portland Events

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Upcoming Events

Confronting Climate Change - Tuesday January 6 2015

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Confronting Climate Change January 6 2015 Invite-Image.PNG
  • Date: Tuesday, January 6, 2015
  • Time: 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
  • Location: First Unitarian Church of Portland Oregon, 1211 SW Main St, Portland, Oregon 97205
  • Jump to this event's wiki page, edit it, discuss it or return to the events page.

Purpose

Presented by Organized Power.

Coming Together As A Single Voice To Confront Climate Change

At the end of last summer, hundreds of thousands of people all over the world participated in an “invitation to change everything”—the “People’s Climate March.” A United Nations’ Climate Change Newsroom reported that more than six hundred thousand people marched in more than twenty-five hundred demonstrations in over one hundred and sixty-six countries.[1] Other estimates were even higher.[2]

The march that took place in New York City now stands as the “largest climate march in history.”[3] Marchers took to the streets to demand a “world we know (that) is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet; a world safe from the ravages of climate change; a world with good jobs, clean air and water, and healthy communities.”

We couldn’t agree more! Yet the marchers have all gone home. City streets have returned to their usual daily hustle and bustle. Business continues as usual. And human activity continues to rapidly degrade the one planet on which all of Earth’s living beings depend. Where do we go from here?

Catastrophic But Not Serious

Cultural critic Slavoj Žižek is fond of telling a tale about a supposed exchange of telegrams between German and Austrian army headquarters in the middle of the First World War. As Žižek tells it, the Germans sent the message “Here, on our part of the front, the situation is serious, but not catastrophic,” to which the Austrians replied “Here, the situation is catastrophic, but not serious.”[4]

So far, our response to the unfolding catastrophe of climate destabilization is similarly absurd. The situation is catastrophic, but our collective response seems less than serious. Some have argued for radical intervention. In a landmark essay, David Holmgren—one of the world’s foremost permaculture practitioners—calls for massive disengagement from consumerism.[5] Holmgren’s basic argument is that the planet-destroying system currently dominating global economics could crash if just ten percent of the world’s middle-class consumers radically cut their consumption. Such a unified effort, he argues, might be just enough to avoid “driving over the climate cliff.”

Organizing A Green New Deal: Ten Million Climate Jobs to Help Solve The Economic And Environmental Crises

Undoubtedly, we must do everything we can to avoid driving over Holmgren’s “climate cliff.” But even as we try and avoid climate catastrophe, we’re still required to take care of ourselves and our families, and contribute productively to our communities.

Mindful of our personal responsibilities, this is also the time to more vigorously and urgently respond to the perils of ongoing climate destabilization and ecological collapse. The stakes are so high that this is our time to make big demands, and enforce them through persistent organizing and movement building.

We believe our goal should be nothing short of transforming the destructive nature of our current economic order into one that will provide working people with meaningful employment, and allow us to live at peace with our natural surroundings. We propose one big demand—A Green New Deal: Ten Million Climate Jobs to Help Solve The Economic And Environmental Crises.

In order to bring this vision into concrete reality, we must build a movement—unified as a single voice—which includes the biggest and most diverse mobilization of ordinary people imaginable. It’s a massive challenge. You are invited to help shape how this vision transforms from idea to reality.

RSVP: Confronting Climate Change (Facebook event and invite page.)

Other details
Free

more information

References

  1. 600,000 People March for Climate Action
  2. How Many People Really Showed Up To The People’s Climate March?
  3. The largest climate march in history
  4. Žižek, Slavoj. “Conclusion: The Political Suspension of the Ethical.” Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism. London: Verso, 2012. 963-1010. Print.
  5. Crash on Demand: Welcome to the Brown Tech Future


Past Events

After The People’s Climate March, What Next? - Tuesday November 11 2014

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After People's Climate March - Tuesday, November 11 2014.PNG
  • Date: Tuesday, November 11, 2014
  • Time: 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
  • Location: First Unitarian Church of Portland Oregon, 1211 SW Main St, Portland, Oregon 97205
  • Jump to this event's wiki page, edit it, discuss it or return to the events page.

Purpose

Presented by Organized Power.

Organizing A Green New Deal: Ten Million Climate Jobs to Help Solve The Economic And Environmental Crises

On Sunday, September 21st, hundreds of thousands of marchers took to the streets in New York City, London, Portland and all over the globe to participate in a People’s Climate March. The NYC march now stands as the “largest climate march in history.”

Marchers took to the streets to “demand the world we know is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet. A world safe from the ravages of climate change. A world with good jobs, clean air, and healthy communities for everyone.”

We couldn’t agree more! But what about the days, weeks and months that follow? After marchers have gone home and the streets return to their usual daily hustle and bustle?

This is the time when the work of organizing and building a movement continues. The stakes are so high that this is our time to make big demands, and enforce them through persistent organizing and movement building.

We believe our goal should be nothing short of transforming the destructive nature of our current economic order into one that will provide working people with meaningful employment, and allow us to live at peace with our natural surroundings.

We propose one big demand:

A Green New Deal: Ten Million Climate Jobs to Help Solve The Economic And Environmental Crises

In order to bring this vision into concrete reality, we must build a movement that includes the biggest and most diverse mobilization of ordinary people imaginable. It’s a massive challenge. You are invited to help shape how this vision transforms from idea to reality.

RSVP: After The People’s Climate March, What Next? (Facebook event and invite page.)

Other details
Free

more information


After The People’s Climate March, What Next? - Tuesday October 14 2014

[improve]

After People's Climate March - Facebook Banner.PNG
  • Date: Tuesday, October 14, 2014
  • Time: 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
  • Location: First Unitarian Church of Portland Oregon, 1211 SW Main St, Portland, Oregon 97205
  • Jump to this event's wiki page, edit it, discuss it or return to the events page.

Purpose

Presented by Organized Power.

Organizing A Green New Deal: Ten Million Climate Jobs to Help Solve The Economic And Environmental Crises

On Sunday, September 21st, hundreds of thousands of marchers took to the streets in New York City, London, Portland and all over the globe to participate in a People’s Climate March. The NYC march now stands as the “largest climate march in history.”

Marchers took to the streets to “demand the world we know is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet. A world safe from the ravages of climate change. A world with good jobs, clean air, and healthy communities for everyone.”

We couldn’t agree more! But what about the days, weeks and months that follow? After marchers have gone home and the streets return to their usual daily hustle and bustle?

This is the time when the work of organizing and building a movement continues. The stakes are so high that this is our time to make big demands, and enforce them through persistent organizing and movement building.

We believe our goal should be nothing short of transforming the destructive nature of our current economic order into one that will provide working people with meaningful employment, and allow us to live at peace with our natural surroundings.

We propose one big demand:

A Green New Deal: Ten Million Climate Jobs to Help Solve The Economic And Environmental Crises

In order to bring this vision into concrete reality, we must build a movement that includes the biggest and most diverse mobilization of ordinary people imaginable. It’s a massive challenge. You are invited to help shape how this vision transforms from idea to reality.

RSVP: After The People’s Climate March, What Next? (Facebook event and invite page.)

Other details
Free

more information

After The People’s Climate March, What Next? - Tuesday September 23 2014

[improve]

After People's Climate March - Tuesday September 23 2014.PNG
  • Date: Tuesday, September 23 2014
  • Time: 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
  • Location: First Unitarian Church of Portland Oregon, 1211 SW Main St, Portland, Oregon 97205
  • Jump to this event's wiki page, edit it, discuss it or return to the events page.

Purpose

Presented by Organized Power.

Organizing A Green New Deal: Ten Million Climate Jobs to Help Solve The Economic And Environmental Crises

Sunday, September 21st, thousands of marchers will take to the streets in New York City, London, Portland and all over the globe to participate in a People’s Climate March. Organizers anticipate that the NYC march will be the “largest climate march in history.”

Organizers say marchers will “take to the streets to demand the world we know is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet. A world safe from the ravages of climate change. A world with good jobs, clean air, and healthy communities for everyone.”

We couldn’t agree more! But what about the morning after? After marchers go home and the streets return to their usual daily hustle and bustle?

After the march is when the work of organizing and building a movement begins. The stakes are so high that this is our time to make big demands, and enforce them through persistent organizing and movement building.

We believe our goal should be nothing short of transforming the destructive nature of our current economic order into one that will provide working people with meaningful employment, and allow us to live at peace with our natural surroundings.

We propose this one demand:

A Green New Deal: Ten Million Climate Jobs to Help Solve The Economic And Environmental Crises

In order to bring this vision into concrete reality, we must build a movement that includes the biggest and most diverse mobilization of ordinary people imaginable. It’s a massive challenge. You are invited to help shape how this vision transforms from idea to reality.

RSVP: After The People’s Climate March, What Next? (Facebook event and invite page.)

Other details
Free

more information


The Portland Women’s Movement Part 2 - Building: from Activism to Institutions - Thursday March 7 2013

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Portland-women-in-trades.jpg
  • Date: Thursday March 7, 2013
  • Time: 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
  • Location: 2nd Floor Gallery, Urban Affairs Building, Portland State University, 506 SW Mill St., Portland
  • Jump to this event's wiki page, edit it, discuss it or return to the events page.

Purpose

Presented by History of Social Justice Organizing & The Center for Women, Politics and Policy

Panel, Q & A discussion, Free

The Portland women’s movement of the 70s began with protests and consciousness raising but quickly expanded to include projects and services: bookstores, abortion information and referral, a rape hotline, women’s studies at PSU, an independent feminist school, a building, a health clinic and more. This panel will cover the Community Law Project, the Rape Relief Hotline, the Red Emma collective, the Portland Women’s Health Clinic, and Prescott House.

Panelists: Ruth Gundle was one of the founders of the Community Law Project (a feminist law collective) in 1975; Kristan Knapp co-founded Prescott House, a place for women getting out of prison to readjust to society. It evolved into Bradley-Angle House, the first shelter for women escaping violence on the West Coast; Ann Mussey was a member of a feminist collective in 1971 Portland called Red Emma which was home to some of the early founders of the Portland Women's Health Clinic; May Wallace (formerly Susan Crawford) helped launch the Rape Relief Hotline in 1973, now known as the Portland Women's Crisis Line.

History of Social Justice Organizing is an ongoing series of presentations by activists and scholars on a wide variety of social justice organizing topics in Portland and elsewhere. The mission for the Center for Women, Politics & Policy is to increase women's leadership in public policy through targeted teaching and community service programs.

A program of Occupy History & the Center for Women, Politics & Policy (cwpp.pdx.edu/)

Find upcoming programs at http://historyofsocialjustice.wordpress.com/. Contact us at info@occupyhistory.us

Other details
The program will be free as usual.

more information


Portland Women’s Movement Part I: Origins - Thursday January 24 2013

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  • Date: Thursday January 24, 2013
  • Time: 7:00 p.m.
  • Location: Smith Center at Portland State University, Room 328, 1825 SW Broadway, Portland
  • Jump to this event's wiki page, edit it, discuss it or return to the events page.

Purpose

The panel will feature Maureen Gray Hudson, Kathleen Saadat and Susan Stoner. Sandy Polishuk will moderate.

Maureen Gray Hudson is an artist, writer and web publisher. She was active in Portland's city-wide women's organizing projects, including the women's speaker's bureau and women's center. In the late 60s and early 70s she was active at Portland State in the day care organizing project, the chair of PSU Speaker's Bureau, President of S.D.S. and co-founder of Women University Members.

Kathleen Saadat has been an activist in Portland, OR since the 1970's. She worked with several women's groups both social and political. Among them The Black Women's Rap Group; Las Mujheres de Colores de Oregon; Radical Women; Black Lesbians and Gays United. She was also part of the group of women who responded to the government's attack on the Fred Hampton Clinic; participated in consciousness raising groups and community building during that time.

Susan Stoner is a local union attorney and historical mystery writer. She was involved in the early 1970's with the Women's International Terrorist Conspiracy from Hell (WITCHES), started the Women's Health Clinic in Neighborhood House, Health Rap, Outside In and a whole slew of community activist projects ranging from children and families to prisoner advocacy.

Moderator: Sandy Polishuk is an oral historian, writer and activist. In the late 60s and early 70s she helped organize women's consciousness raising groups and was a member of both the first women's studies coordinating committee at PSU and the city-wide women's movement speakers bureau.

History of Social Justice Organizing is an ongoing series of presentations by activists and scholars on a wide variety of social justice organizing both in Portland and elsewhere. A program of Occupy History

Find upcoming programs at historyofsocialjustice.wordpress.com. Contact us at info@occupyhistory.us

Other details
The program will be free as usual.

more information


A video of the event is now available for viewing.

The Grange: The Movement Overlooked

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Grange-cartoon.jpg
  • Date: Wednesday - 14 November 2012
  • Time: 7-8:30 pm
  • Location: 236 Smith Center, Portland State University, 1825 SW Broadway
  • Jump to this event's wiki page, edit it, discuss it or return to the events page.

Purpose

Born in the aftermath of the Civil War, for more than 140 years the Grange has played an important role in the fight for prosperity and opportunity for farmers and rural Americans. It was at the forefront in lobbying for regulation of transportation and public utilities, the Sherman Anti-Trust Act (1890), the Pure Food and Drug Act (1906) and Universal Suffrage (1919). The Grange has been the driving force behind improving transportation, waterways; rural postal delivery and how we vote. Additionally, it established cooperative stores and elevators. Learn how the Grange has weaved itself into your everyday life.

Other details
Theresa Thorud is Program Director of the Washington–Yamhill Pomona Grange. She has done extensive research on the history of Granges and on fraternal insurance..

History of Social Justice Organizing is an ongoing series of presentations by activists and scholars on a wide variety of social justice organizing both in Portland and elsewhere. A program of Occupy History.

more information


More past events...
Disclaimer
PLEASE NOTE: Events listed may be endorsed by the Occupy, or sponsored by people who share the goals of the Occupy movement. In addition, there are listings of free or inexpensive events/activities in and around Portland. All events are open to anyone interested in attending.
Would you like to add an event?

Here is a detailed page about how to add events.

References

  1. 600,000 People March for Climate Action
  2. How Many People Really Showed Up To The People’s Climate March?
  3. The largest climate march in history
  4. Žižek, Slavoj. “Conclusion: The Political Suspension of the Ethical.” Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism. London: Verso, 2012. 963-1010. Print.
  5. Crash on Demand: Welcome to the Brown Tech Future